Episode 8: Phrasal Verbs for Business III

phrasal verbs for business

Continuing our series on phrasal verbs!

In this episode, I explain 10 more phrasal verbs in a business context – very useful for business English learners!

Please let me know if you have any questions.

All the best!

Paul

Here is the full transcript:

Phrasal Verbs for Business, part three.

Hi there, I’m Paul Urwin and welcome to the Business English Community podcast, where the world of business meets the English language. We discuss culture, strategies, techniques, vocabulary, grammar and much, much more. Find out more at businessenglishcommunity.com.

Hi, I’m Paul and welcome to episode eight of the Business English Community podcast. In this episode, I’m going to be continuing with the series on phrasal verbs. If you haven’t listened to the introduction to phrasal verbs, I suggest you check that out. That’s back in episode six. In this episode, I’m going to be going through 10 more examples of phrasal verbs in business, in real business situations.

If you want to get in touch, you can email me at info@businessenglishcommunity.com. Don’t forget, we have a podcast out every Tuesday. We have a YouTube video out every Thursday. And if there’s anything in particular that you need help with, then please get in touch, please let me know. I really want to help you take your business English to the next level.

Okay, well let’s get cracking with these 10 examples of phrasal verbs. Number one is to look through. To look through something is to read information and find the details that you need and to kind of get the idea of what is going on. To look through something is to physically look at something, to analyze something, and to get an idea of what is happening.

Let me give you an example. Have you had a chance to look through the report? Have you had a chance you look through the report? Or what about this one? We’ve had a look through your CV and we would like to invite you to an interview. We’ve had a look through your CV and we would like to invite you to an interview. So just kind of looking at something, analyze something, getting the idea of something, understanding the key information in a particular report or in a particular document perhaps. That’s number one, to look through.

Number two, to get on with. Well you can get on with something or you can get on with someone. It’s one of those phrasal verbs that can be used in different ways. It can mean to make progress on something. For example, how are you getting on with the task? How are you getting on with the task? How are you making progress on that particular task? It can also mean to have a good relationship with someone. To get on with someone, means to have a good relationship with that person. An example, I get on well with my colleagues. We have great fun in the office. I get on well with my colleagues. We have great fun in the office. Or what about this one? He’s a difficult customer. Hard to get on with. He’s a difficult customer. Hard to get on with. Difficult to have a good relationship with that particular person in that particular example. So that’s number two, to get on with.

Number three, to sum up. To sum up is to kind of give the conclusions for a particular situation, to share a brief recap of the main points discussed. You might hear this towards the end of a meeting. Before we end the meeting, let me sum up with what we’ve agreed on so far. Before we end the meeting, let me sum up what we’ve agreed on so far. So let me give you the main points, or let me give you the main conclusions regarding what we have talked about today. That’s to sum up, to recap the main points discussed.

Number four, to call off. If you are calling something off, that means that you are canceling some plans, something that was due to happen, it has now been called off and is now no longer going to happen. So it’s being canceled effectively. The worker strike has been called off as the board have agreed to their demands. The worker strike has been called off as the board have agreed to their demands. What about this one? My meeting has been called off, so I’m available this afternoon. My meeting has been called off, so I’m available this afternoon. That’s number four, to call off.

Number five, to put off. We’ve gone from to call off to put off, and this means either to postpone or it can mean that someone has been caused to dislike something or someone. So it can mean to postpone, or it can kind of have this implication of dislike for a particular situation. As always, I’m going to give you a couple of examples. I think it’s much easier for you to get the hang of these phrasal verbs through examples. In terms of postponing, I don’t think we should put this off any longer. We have to take action now. I don’t think we should put this off any longer. We have to take action now. Or, the merger has been put off for now. The merger has been put off for now. You can see that it is a separable phrasal verb. It can be used in a separated form with the two components separated as in put this off. We have separated the two components of the phrasal verb.

That’s when it means to postpone. What about when it causes dislike towards someone or something? Again, let me give you these examples. I don’t think he is the best person to represent the company. His manner can put people off. I don’t think he is the best person to represent the company. His manner can put people off.

Number six, to write up. To write a report or an article or to write something with notes that you have previously taken down. So you’ve already taken the notes, you’ve already written down some ideas about a particular topic and now you are going to write them up. You’re going to write up those notes. You are going to turn those notes into a real report or into a real article. Jim, would you mind writing up the notes and emailing them to me later today? Jim, would you mind writing up the notes and emailing them to me later today? That’s to write up, to write a report or article using notes that you took earlier on.

Number seven, to go over. If you’re asked to go over something you’re being asked to study, to examine, or to review that particular thing. Before we start the meeting, can we go over the monthly figures? Before we start the meeting, can we go over the monthly figures? Can we study them? Can we review them? Can we examine them? So it’s to take a look in some detail at these particular pieces of data in that example, to go over. We can’t sign the deal until we have gone over the contract. We can’t sign the deal until we have gone over the contract, until we have reviewed the contract in some detail. That’s number seven, to go over.

Number eight is to figure something out, to figure out. This is a great phrasal verb. You might hear this expression when your colleagues are trying to understand something or to solve a problem. Don’t worry. If we work together, I’m sure we can figure this out. Don’t worry. If we work together, I’m sure we can figure this out. Or what about this one? These figures make no sense. No matter how hard I try, I just can’t figure it out. These figures make no sense. No matter how hard I try, I just can’t figure it out. I just can’t make sense of it. I just can’t understand it. That’s number eight, to figure out, when you are trying to solve something or trying to understand a problem.

Number nine, to roll out. Roll out, R-O-L-L O-U-T, to roll something out is to make a new service or a product available or to launch something. It’s about sharing something new perhaps with your customers, perhaps with your team, perhaps with a company’s employees. To roll out, to share something new. We expect the new benefits plan to be rolled out within the next month. We expect the new benefits plan to be rolled out within the next month. If the pilot is successful, then it will be rolled out to all the other countries later in the year. If the pilot is successful, then it will be rolled out to all the other countries later in the year. In that sentence the pilot means the test program. So if the pilot is successful, then it will be rolled out, then it will be shared, then it will be also launched in all the other countries later in the year. That’s number nine, to roll out.

And number 10, to fall through. Well of course if you fall, then you might be up on some kind of height and you might hit the ground, so you might fall off your chair for example. But this doesn’t relate to any kind of physical falling. It relates to a deal that has collapsed normally or a plan that is not going ahead. So the plan has failed for some reason, making it impossible to proceed. That’s to fall through. You might hear your colleagues talk about plans or possible partnerships or deals falling through. We have to start all over again. The deal has fallen through. We have to start all over again. The deal has fallen through. The sale was almost complete, but at the last stage it fell through. The sale was almost complete, but at the last stage it fell through. That’s number 10, to fall through.

Now for a very quick summary, number one, to look through is to read information and to find the details that you need. Number two, to get on with something or someone is to make progress or to have a good relationship with. Number three, to sum up is to recap or to provide a summary or conclusions. Number four, to call something off is to cancel plans. Number five, to put off is to postpone or to cause dislike. Number six, to write up is to write a report or article using notes that you took earlier. Number seven, to go over is to study, to examine or review. Number eight, to figure something out, is to try and understand or solve a problem. Number nine, to roll out is to make a new service or product available. Number 10, to fall through is when something has failed.

That’s this session on phrasal verbs. I hope you found it useful. Please let me know if you have any questions. Please let me know if there’s any phrasal verbs in particular that you would like me to cover. You can email me info@businessenglishcommunity.com. You can contact me via the website. Don’t forget, new podcast episode every single Tuesday, and new YouTube video every single Thursday. Thank you so much for your support. Thank you so much for listening wherever you are in the world. I wish you a wonderful day ahead, all the very best, and please let me know how I can help you.

Finally, if you enjoyed today’s episode, I invite you to check out our online learning platform and community at businessenglishcommunity.com. The Business English Community is the essential resource for intermediate and advanced learners who want to take their business English to the next level. We offer extensive audio and video libraries, live webinars, and Ask Me Anything course, and very importantly, an active community where you can get answers to all of your business English questions. If you really want to take action to improve your level quickly, then sign up at businessenglishcommunity.com. That’s it from me. Thanks for listening, all the best, and until next time.

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