Episode 10: Phrasal Verbs for Business V

phrasal verbs for business

More phrasal verbs in real business situations, ideal for business English learners.

I hope you find it useful, and please let me know if you have any questions!

Have a great week!

Paul

Here is the full transcript:

Phrasal Verbs for Business, Part Five.

Hi, there. I’m Paul Urwin and welcome to the Business English Community podcast, where the world of business meets the English language. We discuss culture, strategies, techniques, vocabulary, grammar, and much, much more. Find out more at businessenglishcommunity.com.

Hi, there. Paul here, and welcome to episode 10 of the Business English Community podcast. In this episode, we’re going to be continuing with the series on phrasal verbs. So 10 more phrasal verbs in a business context, so that you can really improve your conversation so that you can really improve your use of the English language in those business, in those real business situations. Also, we now have the full text or the full transcript for each one of these podcasts, completely free, up on the website.

And that means that you can listen to the podcast, you can listen to exactly what I’m saying now, while you are following through the text. So very, very easy. For example, for this episode, all you need to do is go to www.businessenglishcommunity.com/episode10. /episode and then the number 10. Or, you can simply find it through the podcast link on the website. Very, very easy, but it’s very useful to follow through the transcript at the same time as you are listening to the audio.

So a couple of things before we get started. First of all, a reminder to go and get your free, completely free training. Completely free training session from businessenglishcommunity.com. If you just visit the website, there it is right at the top of the page. You can get your free training instantly, so I would really encourage you to go and do that, if you haven’t done so already.

And second of all before we get started, I wanted to tell you a little story because I had a meeting with some of my Business English learners this week, and they’ve been studying with me for a little while now. Probably around a year and a half. And it was just amazing to talk to them. The reason it was amazing is that they are a brilliant example of persistence. These particular students have been studying consistently for that period. They have really been focusing on making English a part of their lives, and they just stuck at it.

They are not the most experienced. They’re not the most natural English learners, but they are one of the most persistent groups with whom or with which I have worked over the years. And they are getting the results, which just goes back to something that I have said before, which is that persistence is absolutely the key. If you are on this journey to really improve your level of business English, then all you need to do is to start and by listening to this podcast, you have already started. And now all you need to do is stick at it. If you stick at it, you will get there, I absolutely promise you. And I also promise you to help you every step of the way, in every way I possibly can.

So that was a little story just to get you started. Let’s get cracking with these 10 phrasal verbs.

Number one is to call back.

Well, that can mean one of a couple of different things. It can mean to ask someone to physically return. Let’s say someone had left a meeting and we needed that particular person to come back. Well, we can call them back, ask them to return. Let me give you an example.

“She had already left the meeting, but something important came up and so they called her back.”

“She had already left the meeting, but something important came up and so they called her back.”

So they’re asking her to return to the meeting. And it can also mean to return a phone call. Very simple, to return a phone call. To call someone back.

“Could you ask her to call me back, please?”

“Could you ask her to call me back, please?”

So that’s number one, to call back.

Number two, to carry on. To carry on.

Well, to carry on means to continue. To continue doing something, to keep going, to keep going in the direction, the right direction, hopefully. So to continue doing something.

“The merger is definitely on, but for now, we should carry on as usual.”

“The merger is definitely on, but for now, we should carry on as usual.”

That’s number two, to carry on.

Number three, to pencil in. To pencil in.

Well, I quite like this one. If you can imagine having a pencil that you can, of course, write things with, but you can also, of course, erase what you have written with a pencil, with an eraser. So if you pencil something in, it’s not completely definite. It’s something that you can change quite easily at a later date. And therefore, if you can imagine writing with a pencil in a diary, let’s say, and then rubbing it out or erasing it, and writing it in somewhere else. That will give you a very good idea of what to pencil in means.

It means, to book something tentatively. To book something that you are not 100% sure is going to take place, at least not at that particular time. So if you pencil something in, you can change it at a later date. It means to book something tentatively.

Let me give you an example.

“Let’s pencil something in for next week.”

“Let’s pencil something in for next week.”

That’s number three, to pencil in.

Number four is to burn out. To burn out.

Well, we’re not burning anything, really in this context. It means a loss of physical or emotional wellbeing. Someone who has had enough. It’s someone who’s burnt or burned out, they’ve simply had enough. They are simply really stressed, or really tired, or overworked. Subject to high levels of stress and frustration.

“These traders in highly stressful jobs are often burned out by the age of 30.”

“These traders in highly stressful jobs are often burned out by the age of 30.”

Number five, to deal with. To deal with.

Well, this can have several different meanings. It can mean to take action to solve a problem. It can mean to accept something.

“Hey, just deal with it.”

And it can also mean to resolve a particular issue. So it’s really related most of the time with solving or resolving an issue, or a certain level of acceptance to deal with something.

Let me give you a few examples that I hope will give you a much better idea.

“He has a lot of experience in dealing with similar problems.”

“He has a lot of experience in dealing with similar problems.”

What about this one:

“They are just going to have to deal with the loss of personnel.”

“They are just going to have to deal with the loss of personnel.”

“They are going to have face-up to that situation,” if you like.

So they’re going to have to deal with it in the sense of facing-up to the difficulties that that might well present.

Or, what about this example:

“I always deal with John in the marketing department.”

“I always deal with John in the marketing department.”

“I always interact with John. I always talk with John. I always negotiate with him.” Or, “I always put my orders through John,” in that particular example.

So several different meanings to deal with can mean to take action, or to accept and face-up to a situation.

Number six, to look forward to.

Well, to look forward to means to feel happy about something that is going to happen in the future. This is a really common one in English, and it’s a really good one, as well. I would really encourage you to use it, and I would also encourage you to make sure that you understand it because this one is, as I said, very important. So let me give you an example:

“I’m really looking forward to meeting you at the conference in Rome.”

“I’m really looking forward to meeting you at the conference in Rome.”

To feel happy about something that is going to happen in the future.

Number seven, to fill out.

Well, to fill out means to complete. A form to fill out. You can also say, “To fill in,” in certain circumstances. So to fill out or to fill in.

To fill out is more common in American English, and to fill in is more common in British English, so a very slight difference there. But really, it means to complete a form, to complete an application, or something like that.

“Please fill out this form and then we can discuss your application.”

“Please fill out this form and then we can discuss your application.”

That’s number seven, to fill out.

Number eight is to use up. To use up is to finish something. To use up something, to finish it. There’s not any of that particular thing left.

“So they have already used up all of their goodwill in this deal,” to give you a business example.

“They have already used up all of their goodwill in this deal.”

That’s number eight, to use up. To finish something.

Number nine, to check in.

Well, you can certainly check into a hotel, and you can certainly check in for a flight. So I’m sure if you’re a business traveler, you’re familiar with those two uses, to check into a hotel, or to check in for a flight. To register for a flight or to really get yourself installed in a hotel. So that’s to check in.

But it can also mean to see what the situation is, to establish what a particular situation is on a particular topic. You might want to check in with the accounting department to see how the invoices are going.

Someone might say, “How is the expansion project going?” And you might reply, “I’m not sure. I’m going to check in with Jim and see what the situation is. I’m going to check in with Jim and see what the situation is. I’m going to talk with that person and find out what is going on.”

So that’s number nine, to check in. Also worth mentioning, to check out. You can also check out when it comes to a hotel. You can check out of a hotel. And you can also check out something, which means to take a look at something. If you’re going to check out something, you can take a look at something.

“So check out these trading volumes.”

“Check out these trading volumes.”

And finally for today, number 10, to branch out.

Well, number 10, to branch out, that means to try something different. Or, to add a different business line. So if you can imagine a tree with a series of branches. Well, one of those branches or a new branch might go in a slightly, or in a very different direction to some of those other branches on the tree. So to branch out means to go in a different direction.

“Company ABC has branched out into healthcare.”

“Company ABC has branched out into healthcare.”

So that’s it for today. Let me give you a very quick summary.

Number one, to call back. To ask someone to return or to return a phone call.

Number two, to carry on. To continue or to keep going.

Number three, to pencil in. To book something tentatively.

Number four, to burn out. To lose physical or emotional wellbeing.

Number five, to deal with. To take action to solve a problem, or to face up to an issue.

Number six, to look forward to. To feel happy about something that is going to happen in the future.

Number seven, to fill out. To complete a form.

Number eight, to use up. To finish something.

Number nine, to check in. To register for a hotel or a flight. Or, to find out the situation of something.

And finally, number 10, to branch out. To try something different.

Well, I hope you found those 10 phrasal verbs useful. We’ve got another episode coming Tuesday next week. So watch out for that one. And in the meantime, don’t forget to sign up for your completely free training, right at the top of the website, businessenglishcommunity.com.

Finally, if you enjoyed today’s episode, I invite you to check out our online learning platform and community at businessenglishcommunity.com, the Business English Community is the essential resource for intermediate and advanced learners, who want to take their business English to the next level. We offer extensive audio and video libraries, live webinars, and Ask Me Anything Calls. And very importantly, an active community where you can get answers to all of your Business English questions. If you really want to take action to improve your level quickly, then sign up at businessenglishcommunity.com.

That’s it for me. Thanks for listening. All the best. And until next time.

Level up your Business English!

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