Episode 11: Phrasal Verbs for Business VI

phrasal verbs for business English

Welcome to the last in the phrasal verbs series!

I really hope you’ve found this series useful!  When you complete this session, you will have covered 50 phrasal verbs, together with real business examples.

Please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

All the very best!

Paul

Here is the full transcript:

Phrasal Verbs for Business, Part Six. Hi, there. I’m Paul Urwin and welcome to the Business English Community podcast where the world of business meets the English language. We discuss culture, strategies, techniques, vocabulary, grammar and much, much more. Find out more at businessenglishcommunity.com.

Hi, Paul here. Hope you’ve had a fantastic week so far and welcome to episode 11 of the Business English Community podcast. This is the last in the series on phrasal verbs, so I hope you’ve been enjoying this series. I hope you’ve been finding it useful. As always, please let me know if you have any questions on phrasal verbs or anything else related to Business English for that matter.

A couple of quick reminders before we get started. If you haven’t downloaded your free training from the Business English Community website, I really suggest that you go and do that. And also, on the website, you will find the full transcripts, the full texts of every single podcast so you can read along at the same time as you are listening. That can be a really useful exercise.

Just go to businessenglishcommunity.com. Click on podcasts at the top. Find the podcast that you’re listening to if you’re not listening already directly from the website. And when you click on the podcast, you will see the full transcript there, so very, very useful and a very worthwhile exercise.

Okay, we’ll let’s get cracking with today’s 10 phrasal verbs. Well, number one is to note down, to note down, to write something down, normally so that you won’t forget it. Let me give you an example. He carefully noted down the client’s name and address. He carefully noted down the client’s name and address. He carefully wrote it down so that he wouldn’t forget it. Important to mention here the difference between noted down and just noted.

If you just note something, you make a mental register. You remember it, but you might not necessarily note it down. I could say the same sentence, he carefully noted the client’s name and address, and that doesn’t necessarily mean that he wrote it down. But noted down definitely means to write down. That’s number one, to note down.

Number two, to get together. Well, this has a couple of different meanings. The first one is to meet up physically with a person or persons such as, let’s get together at the conference next week. Let’s get together at the conference next week. But as well as meaning to meet up physically or in person, it can also relate to a meeting of minds if you like, or an agreement on some particular topic.

So, I might say something like, Mike and Diana really need to get together on this. Mike and Diana really need to get together on this. Meaning that Mike and Diana need to come to some form of agreement. They don’t necessarily need to meet physically but they need to agree on their ideas or agree on a particular direction. Number two, to get together, that can mean to come together physically or mentally.

Number three, to lay off. This is to make someone redundant, to make someone redundant. They lose their job but they’re not being fired. They’re not being sacked. They’re being made redundant because there is no longer a position for them at the company. She’s not happy at all, she’s just been laid off. She’s not happy at all, she’s just been laid off.

Number four, to keep up with. Well, if you’re going to keep up with someone, you’re going to keep alongside with them. You’re going to keep pace with them. And this can be used, for example, in a race. A particular runner or a particular driver can keep up with another competitor, let’s say, in a particular race. It can be used in a physical sense but it can also be used in a business context in a slightly different sense.

So, let me give you the following example. We really need to keep up with the competition. We really need to keep up with the competition. We need to keep pace with the competition. We need to maintain our position relative to the competition. It’s not the same sort of physical race although it is a kind of a competition, of course, and it can definitely be used in that context. That’s number four, to keep up with.

Number five, to drop in. Well, if you are going to drop in on someone, it’s to visit them normally, an unexpected, unplanned visit something that wasn’t in the diary. Let me give you an example, the lawyer dropped in to see us on her way to court. The lawyer dropped in to see us on her way to court. An unplanned visit, an unexpected visit something relatively informal. That’s number five, to drop in.

Number six, to put forward. To put forward, that is, to suggest something such as an idea. It was Mark who put forward the idea of hiring more sales people. It was Mark who put forward the idea of hiring more sales people. That’s number six, to put forward.

Number seven, to opt in. To opt in is to be included in something at one’s own wish or voluntarily so you want to be included and therefore, you are going to opt in. Nowadays, this is most frequently used with a mailing list online. You will opt in to a mailing list in order to be included. Have you opted in to the Business English Community mailing list? Have you opted in to the Business English Community mailing list? There’s an example for you.

Number eight, to put together. Well, to put together is to collate or organize, to build or create, or to assemble using different things or different parts. To form a team is to put together. They put together an amazing conference. They put together an amazing conference. That means that they organized the conference but by using different parts or different components.

To organize a conference, you would have to organize speakers. You would have to organize a room or a conference room, and it’s the combination of those components that really suits the verb, to put together, to put together. A team of experts needs to be put together if we are going to be successful. A team of experts needs to be put together if we are going to be successful. That’s number eight, to put together.

Number nine, to pass up, to pass up. Well, that’s to miss an opportunity or to not take advantage of an opportunity that has been presented to you. He passed up the chance to go and work in Berlin. He passed up the chance to go and work in Berlin. He chose not to take advantage of that particular opportunity. That’s number nine, to pass up.

Number 10, to sort out. Well, this one has several meanings and here are two of the main ones. The first one is to deal with something such as a problem, to deal with something such as a problem. It’s been difficult but I know she is going to sort out the problems with the contractors. It’s been difficult but I know she is going to sort out the problems with the contractors.

And it can also mean to tidy up or to organize, to tidy up or to organize. You really need to sort out those papers. You really need to sort out those papers. You need to tidy up those papers. You need to put those papers in order. And that’s number 10, to sort out.

Well, let me give you a very quick summary. Number one is to note down. That’s to write something down so you don’t forget it. Number two, to get together. That is either to meet physically or to agree on something. Number three, to lay off. That is to be made redundant. Number four, to keep up with. That is to keep alongside with or to keep pace with. Number five, to drop in. That is to visit unexpectedly. Number six, to put forward. That is to suggest something such as an idea.

Number seven, to opt in. That is to be included in something voluntarily. Number eight, to put together. That is to assemble using different things or parts. Number nine, to pass up. That is to miss an opportunity or to not take advantage of one. Number 10, to sort out. That can mean to deal with something such as a problem or to tidy up or organize.

Well, that brings us to the end of this series on phrasal verbs. I hope you have found it really useful. I hope you’ve enjoyed it. Please let me know how you are getting on with phrasal verbs. And in particular if you have any questions, I’d be very, very happy to help you. As always, to all of my listeners all around the world, thank you so much for tuning in. I really, really appreciate it. And I hope I can help you as much as I possibly can with your business English.

That’s it for this week. I’ll be back next week with a different topic, so watch out for that. In the meantime, I hope everything goes very well for you, and I wish you every success with your business English and with your business projects. Well, with everything actually, all the best. Have a fantastic week and yes, I’ll see you next time.

Finally, if you enjoy today’s episode, I invite you to check out our online learning platform and community at businessenglishcommunity.com. The business English community is the essential resource for intermediate and advanced learners who want to take their business English to the next level. We offer extensive audio and video libraries, live webinars, and ask-me-anything calls, and very importantly, an active community where you can get answers to all of your business English questions.

If you really want to take action to improve your level quickly, then sign up at businessenglishcommunity.com. That’s it for me. Thanks for listening. All the best and until next time.

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