Episode 7: Phrasal Verbs for Business II

phrasal verbs for business

In this episode, I continue with the phrasal verbs for business series.

Each episode (apart from the introduction) covers 10 phrasal verbs and discusses their use in real business situations.

I know that many business English learners have difficulties with phrasal verb, and I really hope that these podcasts are going to help you become very comfortable at using phrasal verbs.

Here is the full transcript:

Hi there, I’m Paul Urwin, and welcome to the Business English Community Podcast, where the world of business meets the English language. We discuss culture, strategies, techniques, vocabulary, grammar, and much, much more. Find out more at businessenglishcommunity.com.

Hi there, Paul here, and welcome to episode seven of the Business English Community Podcast. This is the episode where we’re really going to get into these examples of phrasal verbs. If you haven’t listened to the introduction, I would really suggest that you go and listen to that first, that’s episode six, phrasal verbs one. And in that episode, I explained a little bit of the theory about phrasal verbs.

So, either before listening to this episode, or if you want to finish this episode, which includes examples of phrasal verbs, and then go back, I would really suggest that you listen to that introduction.

Anyway, as I said, I hope you’re having a great week so far, and really there are lots of things going on within the community. So, we have a podcast coming out every Tuesday, we have a YouTube video coming out every Thursday, we have articles up on the website. So there are many, many opportunities for you to get involved with what we are doing. And one of the reasons I chose community for those company is that it really is a community, it really involves all of you. I really value all of your opinions, and especially all of your needs when it comes to learning English, and learning business English in particular, because without your opinion and without your guidance, I don’t know what topics are causing you the most difficulties.

In fact, that’s one of the main reason why I decided to do this series on phrasal verbs, because I know how difficult it is for many people. So, if you do wish to get in contact, you can email me, I’m info@businessenglishcommunity.com. Or you can simply fill in a form on the website, businessenglishcommunity.com, and let me know how I can help you.

Okay, well let’s get started with this week’s phrasal verbs, from one to ten. Number one, is to set up, to set up. Well, this one has several different meanings, and in these examples, first of all I’m not going to go through every single meaning, I’m going to try and cover the main meanings, because some phrasal verbs simply have too many variations. And the other point that I wanted to remind you of is that I’m going to try and use examples from business English, or from business situations. This is of course the Business English Community, and I try to focus on business related examples.

If you’re interested in general English, this will still be a massive, massive help to you when it comes to phrasal verbs. So number one, to set up. Several different meanings, the first one is to start something, such as a business. An example, they have set up an office in Miami. They have set up an office in Miami. So it can mean to start something, such as a business.

Another meaning is to organize something, to organize something such as a meeting. She wants to set up a meeting for next Tuesday. She wants to set up a meeting for next Tuesday. So we already have two different meanings for the phrasal verb to set up.

Here’s a third meaning, to put some kind of structure in place, to put some kind of structure in a particular location. So, they set up a mobile office by the train station to help with the extra customers. They set up a mobile office by the train station to help with the extra customers. You can just imagine someone setting up this sort of structure in that particular location.

Or what about, and this is the final example for to set up, what about to get a piece of equipment ready for use. I’m sure you’ve heard the term to set up a computer, and here’s an example, the new computers have been set up and are ready to use. The new computers have been set up and are ready to use. A great phrasal verb, to set up, very useful, a number of different meanings. That’s number one.

Number two, to help out, to help out. Well, to help out is to do a part of someone’s work, or to give someone money. So, in terms of doing a part of someone’s work, if you’re helping out you’re maybe giving them a hand, you’re helping them along. You’re sharing their task or their workload, or helping them with a project. Something like that, so that’s to help someone else. Can you please help me out with the projections? Can you please help me out with the projections?

And what about giving someone money, how is that helping out? Well, someone may need some extra money, and they just want you to help out with a little bit of extra cash in order to get their project started, for example. I need $10,000 to get my business started, and I hope that you can help me out. I need $10,000 to get my business started, and I hope that you can help me out. So that’s number two, to help out.

Number three is to find out, to find out. That means to discover, or to learn something. To find something out. We’re going to have to find out what the case history says. We’re going to have to find out what the case history says. You’re going to have to discover it, you’re going to have to learn what that particular case history says.

It can also mean to catch, let me give you an example. He was stealing, and someone found him out, someone caught him. He was stealing, and someone found him out. So that’s another example of the phrasal verb to find out.

Number four, to get through. Well, I’m going to cover three different meanings for to get through. The first one is to deal with something difficult, if you get through something you’re passing through, or dealing with a difficult time. And the idea of getting through it is to come out the other side having dealt with that particular problem or issue. Here’s an example, the company will get through these difficult times. The company will get through these difficult times.

Second example is to connect on the phone, to connect with someone on the phone. Can you get through to someone on the phone? Did you get through to a particular contact? I tried to speak to Martin, but I couldn’t get through. I tried to speak to Martin, but I couldn’t get through. So you’re trying to connect to someone on the phone, in that example, to get through is to connect on the phone.

And finally, to get through can also mean to pass a test, or to pass an exam. Don’t worry, you’ll get through the exam easily. Don’t worry, you’ll get through the exam easily. So, in that example it’s all about overcoming a particular hurdle, and the hurdle is the exam, or the test.

So, three different meanings of to get through, to deal with something difficult, to connect on the phone, or to pass a test or exam.

Number five, to knock down, to knock down. This is a little bit informal, and it means, normally, to reduce prices, to reduce the price of something is to knock that price down. One way to get quick results would be to knock down the prices. One way to get quick results would be to knock down the prices. So that’s number five, to knock down.

Number six, to weigh up. Well, to weigh up is to think carefully about something, to evaluate the pluses and minuses, or the pros and cons, or the advantages and disadvantages of something, before taking a decision. So I would like you to imagine someone with something in each hand, and moving their hands up and down, weighing up, checking the weight of those two items, to try and decide which one is the best. That gives you a visual picture of to weigh up. It’s to consider, to consider the pros and cons of something, before taking an educated decision. You’ve considered everything, and now you are going to take your decision. So that’s to weigh up. Let me give you an example, she weighed up the pros and cons very carefully before deciding to move to Paris. She weighed up the pros and cons very carefully before deciding to move to Paris. So that’s number six, to weigh up.

And number seven is to run out of, to run out of. Now, to run out of means to be used up, or exhausted. To be finished. To run out of something means that there is no more of that particular something left. Easy to explain with an example of course, here we go. Around the globe, we are simply running out of oil. Around the globe, we are simply running out of oil. That’s number seven, to run out of.

Number eight, to measure up. Now, when I hear those words, to measure up, I can imagine an engineer on a building site with some kind of measure, some kind of tape measure perhaps, taking measurements of the location in order to build something. And that is absolutely one of the uses of this particular phrasal verb, it’s to take measurements, to measure up. So I might say they are measuring up for her new office. They are measuring up for her new office. So that is the physical description of to measure up, and it is used in that context.

But it also has another meaning, and it means to be good enough, to be good enough for something. Do you measure up to the task? Are you good enough for that particular task? The question is, when it comes to the demands of the job, will he measure up? The question is, when it comes to the demands of the job, will he measure up? So in that phrase, or in that sentence, I mean is he going to be good enough for that particular job? Is he going to measure up to the task? So, two meanings, to be good enough, or to actually physically measure something.

Number nine, to give up, to give up on something. Well, to give up is to stop trying, you don’t really want to know about it any more. You’ve had enough, and you’re going to give up. The project was just too expensive, and they have given up on it completely. The project was just too expensive, and they have given up on it completely. They have stopped trying with that particular project.

It can also mean to yield control, to give up control of something. He gave up his voting rights, as part of the takeover. He gave up his voting rights, as part of the takeover. So it can mean either to stop trying, that you’ve had enough, or someone has had enough with a particular situation and they don’t see any future in that situation, and therefore they’re going to leave it, they’re going to give up. They’re going to stop trying. Or, it can mean to yield or to cede, to give up rights over something, such as in that voting rights example. He gave up his voting rights as part of the takeover.

And finally for this session, number 10, to look into. What does to look into mean? Well, it means to investigate. There is definitely something going on there, Claudia is going to look into the legal implications. There is definitely something going on there, Claudia is going to look into the legal implications. So to investigate, to find out what is really going on.

What’s going on with the merger? I’m not sure, but I’ll have a look into it for you. I’ll have a look into for you. I’ll investigate for you. That’s number 10, that’s to look into.

Okay, time for a quick recap, number one, to set up. Several meanings, to start something such as a business, to organize something such as a meeting, to build some kind of structure, or to get a piece of equipment ready for use.

Number two, to help out. To do a part of someone’s work, or to give someone some money.

Number three, to find out. That’s to discover, or to learn. Or, alternatively, to catch someone.

Number four, to get through. That can mean to deal with something difficult, to connect on the phone, or to pass a test.

Number five, to knock down. This is an informal one, it means to reduce the price.

Number six, to weight up, to think carefully about something before making a decision.

Number seven, to run out of, to be used up or exhausted.

Number eight, to measure up. To physical measure something, or to be good enough for something.

Number nine, to give up, means to stop trying, or to yield control.

And number 10, to look into means to investigate.

And that brings us to the end of this session on phrasal verbs, 10 phrasal verbs that you can start using in your own real conversations, and in your own writing. And we have 40 more phrasal verbs to come, remember this is a series of 50 phrasal verbs in total. Don’t forget the introduction, that’s back in episode six. Together with the examples, I think this is really going to provide a good foundation for you to get started in phrasal verbs.

As always, please let me know if you have any questions. You can contact me via the website, that’s www.businessenglishcommunity.com. Finally, if you enjoyed today’s episode, I invite you to check out our online learning platform and community at businessenglishcommunity.com. The Business English Community is the essential resource for intermediate and advanced learners, who want to take their business English to the next level. We offer extensive audio and video libraries, live webinars, and ask me anything calls. And, very importantly, an active community where you can get answers to all of your business English questions.

If you really want to take action to improve your level quickly, then sign up at businessneglishcommunity.com. That’s it from me, thanks for listening, all the best, and until next time …

 

 

Level up your Business English!

Subscribe to get podcasts, resources, vocabulary, webinars and more!

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Powered by Seva
Share This Post
Have your say!
0 0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>